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Turn a Pack of Ramen Noodles into a Healthy Snack

From Everyday Food

This crunchy Ramen Noodle snack mix makes for a delicious and healthy way for adults to enjoy Ramen noodles. Plus, it’s incredibly easy, with only three steps.

Crunchy Ramen Snack Mix Recipe 



Ingredients 


2 packages ramen, broken into small pieces (seasoning packet discarded)

1 cup raw cashews

1 cup raw peanuts

1 cup cornflakes

3 tablespoons vegetable oil

4 teaspoons curry powder

1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper

1/2 teaspoon fine salt

1/2 cup fried or freeze-dried peas

Directions

1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. On a rimmed baking sheet, toss ramen, cashews, peanuts, and cornflakes with oil until coated.

2. Spread mixture in an even layer. Combine curry powder, cayenne, and salt; sprinkle over ramen mixture.

3. Bake until golden brown, about 10 minutes, stirring halfway through. Stir in peas and let cool completely before serving.

Healthier Kids in 2013

Here’s a New Years’ resolution that will help your child stay healthier in 2013. Give them cheese and veggies as an afternoon snack.

A new study has found that healthy snacks can help take the edge off of kids’ between-meal hunger pangs.  In fact, it may even help put a dent in rates of childhood obesity.

According to a story on WebMD.com, children who were given cheese and vegetables as a snack ate 72% fewer calories than children who snacked on potato chips.  The impact was even greater for kids who were overweight or obese.

The study involved about 200 kids entering third or sixth grade. They were given chips, cheese, veggies, or a combination of veggies and cheese, and allowed to snack freely while watching a 45-minute TV show.

Kids who chose the veggies-only option took in the fewest calories, but those offered the combo snack or cheese only took in about the same number of calories. Either option meant far fewer calories than those who were served chips, which suggests that replacing potato chips even with cheese alone may be an option.

The good news is that children will accept healthier snacks.  Erin Corrigan, a clinical nutrition manager at Miami Children’s Hospital in Florida, says “snacks are an important part of a child’s diet if you provide nutrient-dense foods.”

Although cheese can be high in calories, it is also high in protein and calcium, Corrigan says “Fruits and vegetables have more fiber, which helps people feel full quicker and longer.  When combined with protein it’s the perfect combination for a well-balanced snack.”

Other possible healthy options include and yogurt and granola, hummus and veggies, and peanut, sunflower, or almond nut butter with fruit or whole-grain crackers.

I’m Bill Maier for Shine.FM.

Click here for the audio version of this article.

Hold the Salt!

Here’s an important story for parents as we get ready to enter the New Year. Are your kids getting too much SALT in their diet?  The fact is that childhood obesity is a growing problem in the US, and excess salt intake may have a lot to do with it.

CBS News writer Ryan Jaslow reports on a new study done in Australia—it found that reducing the amount of salt in kids’ diets may be a first step in preventing obesity. That’s because salty foods lead kids to reach for sugary drinks—a major contributor to childhood obesity.

The researchers tracked the eating and drinking habits of 4,200 Australian kids. They found that the kids who took in the most salt, also consumed the most sugary drinks.

For every one gram of salt per day, children took in 17 grams per day more of a sugary drink.  Children who drank more than one serving per day of a sugary drink were more likely to be obese.

While we know that salty foods can cause us to be thirsty, experts were quick to point out the study did not show cause and effect for salt’s role in obesity.

By the way, The American Heart Association recommends that people should take in no more than 1,500 milligrams milligrams of sodium each day.

However, a recent survey found most Americans average 3,400 milligrams of sodium each day, mostly from processed and restaurant foods.

And what are the biggest sodium culprits?  Breads and rolls, cold cuts and cured meats, pizza, poultry, soup and sandwiches.

To learn more about a healthy level of salt intake, go to the Heart Association’s website at heart.org.

I’m Bill Maier for Shine.FM.

CLICK HERE for the audio version of this article.

11 Facts about the McDonald’s McRib

It’s Kurt from Shine Mornings. It’s no secret that I love the McRib, but I didn’t all this! Who’da thunk?

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/11-amazing-facts-about-the-mcdonald-s-mcrib-170212930.html

Diet-Friendly Baking Swaps

CLICK HERE to see a list of healthy holiday baking swaps to try!