Facebook Friends

Can spending time too much time with your friends be bad for your health? It may be, if they’re all online.

 

Facebook builds community, and connects us with family and friends, but too much time following everyone else’s life may leave you hitting the “don’t like button” on yours.

 

Many studies level of commitment to time spent on Facebook. In other words, frequent users are often more unhappy.

 

Researchers believe the picture-perfect life in many peoples’ posts can leave others feeling left out or dissatisfied with their own life.

 

Here’s what you can do to avoid the Facebook blues. Limit your time online. Instead, spend time with friends and family in person. While you’re counting the number of friends you have or likes you receive, don’t forget to count your blessings.

 

Find more information on this and many other health topics, when you log onto Shine.FM.

Listen to today’s audio here. 

Greek Mythology

yogurt

A listener asked me, “Is Greek Yogurt really a big deal?” It’s showing up everywhere, but Greek Yogurt is a big trend and overall the hype has some merit, but there is some Greek Mythology that you need to be aware of.

Greek Yogurt can have the same active yogurt cultures and calcium benefits as a regular yogurt. It’s often thicker and creamier, may have less sugar and calories plus significantly higher protein per serving.

However, you have to read the labels. Nutritional content varies widely. Some Greek Yogurts have added sugars that can pack on the calories, while others contain unnecessary thickening ingredients and may not have more protein.

If you want to be safe buy plain Greek Yogurt after you’ve read the label and then add a small amount of honey or fresh fruit. It’s worth buying into the hype as long as you’re buying right.

If you would like to see other blogs by Dr. Walt on this topic, click here and then click on today’s story.

Listen to today’s audio here. 

Alternative Medicines

headache

Your head is pounding from chronic headaches. You’ve tried traditional therapies and wonder if it’s time to try complimentary and alternative options, like massage, acupuncture, herbs, or anything else you think might work.

You’re not alone. In fact, you probably know someone who uses alternatives to over the counter medicines and traditional remedies, and they may swear by their effectiveness. However, as more people look into alternative therapies more questions are arising.

Many complimentary remedies lack scientific evidence that they actually work, or are missing important data on their long-term safety. The good news is there are alternative therapies that may help, but there are many that are questionable.

If you are considering alternative medicines talk to your doctor or pharmacist, and do your homework. Don’t buy into a false claim. You may end up with a headache you don’t want.

If you would like to see other blogs by Dr. Walt on this topic, click here and then click on today’s story.

Listen to today’s audio here. 

Prescription Drug Abuse in the Home

Teen drug use is no laughing matter, but parents themselves may be writing a prescription for abuse.

 

Prescription drug abuse is on the rise with teens and the problem can start in our own homes. Many teens require prescriptions medications like sedatives, pain relievers, or ADHD medications.

 

However, researchers found 75% of teens had uncontrolled access to their medications. This means that parents didn’t supervise the use or lock them up when they weren’t needed.

 

We all want to believe the best in our kids so taking tougher measures may be hard. And many parents are simply caught up in the “my child would never do that” syndrome. But it’s better to be safe than sorry.

 

Treat prescription drugs like you would alcohol and keep tight control on them. That’s the best medicine for protecting your teen.

 

If you would like to see other blogs by Dr. Walt on this topic, click here and then click on today’s story.

Listen to today’s audio here. 

Dementia and B Vitamins

There is news worth noting in the battle of Alzheimer’s disease. Two new studies highlight another weapon in possibly preventing it.

 

Doctors studied people with increased dementia risk and found that high dose B vitamin treatment with folic acid, vitamin B6 and vitamin B12 slowed brain shrinkage over two years.

 

In the second study the B vitamin regimen slowed shrinkage of brain rations. Specifically associated with cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s disease.

 

The benefits of the vitamins were confined to patients with elevated amounts of the amino acid called homocysteine. High levels are linked to faster brain shrinkage and dementia.

 

So if the condition runs in your family you could ask your physician to check you homocysteine level. If its elevated, high doses of these particular B vitamins may be well be worth a try.

 

If you would like to see other blogs by Dr. Walt on this topic, click here and then click on today’s story.

Listen to today’s audio here. 

Fish Oil

If you’ve decided to take fish oil, you might be fishing for the right advice on how to start. If you’re caught up in the confusion, I’ll let you off the hook.

 

Most of my patients take fish oil for either improving heart health or improving their triglyceride levels. Food can help with other conditions.

 

It’s easy to look at how many grams to take, but the amount of EPA and DHA in each capsule is really the key. When shopping look for products that have passed independent quality tests to avoid unhealthy levels of mercury and other substances. I like Consumer Lab and USD.

 

Finally, shop around. Prices can vary dramatically. Although fish oil has numerous health benefits how much to take depends on why you are taking it. Before you start talk to your doctor so you’ll reel in the right dosage.

 

If you would like to see other blogs by Dr. Walt on this topic, click here and then click on today’s story.

Listen to today’s audio here. 

Anxious Adolescence

teenanxiety

You work hard and have so much stress and pressure to deal with. Oh, to be a kid again where life is so carefree!

Actually, you kids may be struggling even more than you are.

In a new study, forty percent of teens said they suffered from irritability or anger, while almost as many felt anxiety, depression, or sadness. The main culprit: stress.

And this stress can destroy a child’s ability to keep up in school, have healthy relationships, and avoid substance abuse. Plus, stress damages physical health through loss of sleep or poor eating habits. It’s a destructive domino effect many parents aren’t even aware of.

Teens need your help. Stay tuned to your child’s moods, academic performance, and changes in behavior—and talk to them about stress.  Encourage them to pray, exercise, journal, and find healthy ways to make adolescence less anxious.

You can read additional blogs by Dr. Larimore on this topic here. Just scroll down the home page to find and click on the article in which you’re interested. In addition, you can see Dr. Walt’s twice-daily devotional, Morning Glory, Evening Grace, here. Last, but not least, limited numbers of autographed copies of Dr. Walt’s books are available here.

Listen to today’s audio here. 

Go Nuts

nuts

A patient came to me confused. “One moment I hear nuts are fattening.  Then I hear they’re good for me. Which is the truth?”

Well, the truth about nuts is a little nutty. Yes, they are fattening. And yes, you should eat them. I’ll explain.

Research shows those who regularly eat a daily serving of nuts reduce their risk of heart disease by 25 percent, and their overall risk of death by 20 percent. Now that is nuts.

There are handfuls of studies showing other health benefits of nuts, so I recommend them. However, they are high in fat and calories, so sticking to a serving a day is best.

Rather than adding them to the diet you’re already eating, use them to replace foods like meats, refined grains, sweets or processed snacks. And talk to your doctor about which ones are the healthiest. Some are much better for you than others.

You can read additional blogs by Dr. Larimore on this topic here. Just scroll down the home page to find and click on the article in which you’re interested. In addition, you can see Dr. Walt’s twice-daily devotional, Morning Glory, Evening Grace, here. Last, but not least, limited numbers of autographed copies of Dr. Walt’s books are available here.

Peek a Boo Perks

Baby

There you are, developing your child’s visual system, increasing their perceptual continuity—which helps them know when an object is really in front of them or not—all while nerves in the child’s visual system are branching out, building circuits that will affect his or her visual accuracy the rest of their life … whew. And you thought playing peek-a-boo was a simple little game.

Not only does it elicit giggles from babies, but studies also suggest there is science behind the silliness.

Researchers believe by four to six months of age, infants learn perceptual continuity. During these months the child’s visual system continues it’s key development.

While the body does its work on its own, games like peek-a-boo add an important stimulus to the child as they sit back and watch the world around them.

Now you don’t have to feel so silly.

You can read additional blogs by Dr. Larimore on this topic here. Just scroll down the home page to find and click on the article in which you’re interested. In addition, you can see Dr. Walt’s twice-daily devotional, Morning Glory, Evening Grace, here. Last, but not least, limited numbers of autographed copies of Dr. Walt’s books are available here.

Portion Sizes

slowfood

Here’s news that will shock you: eating bigger portions of food can lead to weight gain. Ok, that deserves a “no kidding.” But a new study on portion sizes offers a helping of great information.

Researchers found that people given large servings of food ate more than those given smaller ones, even after hearing about the impact of portion size on consumption.

So what does this mean for you? Try cutting down on portion sizes—for you and your family. If you’re afraid of going hungry, here’s some good news: other research has found that smaller servings fill us up just as much as the larger ones, as long as we slow down our rate of eating.

Enjoy some fellowship with your food. Taking a little more time to eat, along with a reduction on the plate, could mean a big reduction in your waistline—and you’ll build relationships while building better health.

You can read additional blogs by Dr. Larimore on this topic here. Just scroll down the home page to find and click on the article in which you’re interested. In addition, you can see Dr. Walt’s twice-daily devotional, Morning Glory, Evening Grace, here. Last, but not least, limited numbers of autographed copies of Dr. Walt’s books are available here.